Teacher Resources

Lesson plan 2 -  
Hut Hut!  How is Theater like Football?   
     
Grade level:  4- 6

Producing a play takes many people with different skill sets.  If you
look at the jobs that make up a football team, you will find a coach, a
quarterback, regular players and  special teams.  Players set aside
many hours of practice to prepare for the big game.
Theater is not so very different.  Look at the pairs of jobs below then
draw a line from the football jobs to the theater job that most closely
match.

Coach/Director
A football coach can be compared to the director of a play.  The coach
plans the strategy, picks players and calls the plays during the game.  
The director in a Theatrical production selects the play to be
performed; she picks the actors and directs them throughout the
rehearsal period.

Quarterback/Lead Actor
In football, the quarterback is the lead team member.  He sets the
example for the entire team and carries the game through his quick
wits and knowledge of the opposition.  The Lead Actor in a play
carries the weight of having the most lines and usually carrying the
largest emotional or physical burden of the play.  

Football players/Actors
Members of a football team follow the coach’s directions; memorize
plays and practice in order to hone their football skills.  They
occasionally study ballet or yoga to build stamina and flexibility.  
Actors in a play take direction from the director.  They memorize their
lines and learn their blocking (which movements go with which lines
in the play) they learn new skills like Fencing, dance, singing and
foreign accents.

Special Teams/Technical Crew
Special teams in the game of Football such as kick off teams, punt
return and the field goal teams all have very specialized jobs.   They
must be practiced and ready to go at a moment’s notice. In a play, the
Technical Crew is made up of the Sound, Lighting, Construction,
Costume and Hair/Make-up crews.  Each crew learns specialized
jobs and a play cannot be performed without these crews working in
unison with the actors and the director.  

Referee/Producer
The referee’s job is to make sure that the game goes according to the
rules of the game.  Referees need to learn the complex rules of the
game and enforce them without playing favorites.  A Theatrical
Producer’s job is to make sure that the play is following the budget
set up for the play.  A budget is the amount of money set aside to pay
for everything from the actor’s pay, the costumes, theater rental, and
technical staff.  The producer needs to make sure that the entire cast
and crew follow the rules of the budget so that the play makes money.

Draw a line from the Football job to the matching
Theater job.

Football                           Theater  
Coach                                Producer
Punt Return                       Lead Actor
Quarterback                       Actors
Referee                              Director
Football Players                 Sound Director
Designing the set
VOCABULARY WORDS:
THE TAMING OF THE SHREW
Advanced Students
Questions about the set:  MACBETH

Activity:
Why do you think the Director chose to put two water elements on the stage?  
What scenes in Macbeth are about water?  

What is the only color on the stage?  Why?

Look at the initial stage design above.  
How is the initial design different than the actual stage design?  
List three elements that are different than the initial design
List three elements that are the same as the initial design.

The waterfall is falling from approximately 20 feet into a pit in the stage deck.  Come up
with an idea to muffle the noise of the water as it hits the ground from 20 feet in the air.

After seeing the production, spend some time to Design your own set for the play.
Creative Writing
Lesson Plan 1:  Creative Writing        Grade levels 7-12                                 

Why say it simply when you can jazz it up, Shakespeare Style?
Shakespeare never took the easy way out when he wrote.  He tried to make even the most
commonplace statements elegant and poetical.  

Read the quotes from the plays below and try to figure out the simple meaning of the lines.

1.        The iron tongue of midnight hath told twelve.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Act v. Sc. 1.

_______________________________________________________________________  


2.         A goodly apple rotten at the heart:
   O, what a goodly outside falsehood hath!
The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 3.

_______________________________________________________________________

3.        And he will make the face of heaven so fine
  That all the world will be in love with night,
  And pay no worship to the garish sun.
Romeo and Juliet. Act iii. Sc. 2.

________________________________________________________________________

4.        Night’s candles are burnt out, and jocund day
  Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain-tops.
Romeo and Juliet. Act iii. Sc. 5.

________________________________________________________________________

Write your own Shakespearean version of the statements below:

1.         It is very cold outside.

________________________________________________________________________

2.         The night was dark and stormy.


________________________________________________________________________

3.         The dog would not stop barking at the cat.

William Shakespeare contributed considerably to the English language and his plays contain
many words and phrases seen for the first time in print.  

Many academics are quick to point out that it is difficult to say for certain whether he invented
these words or phrases or if he was the first to use them in print.   Despite this caution, most
academics agree that quite a number of  words and turns of phrase are indeed "original,"
insomuch as they are documented in the written record only as far back as Shakespeare.

Phrases still in use today:

• Eaten out of house and home
• Pomp and circumstance
• Foregone conclusion
• Full circle
• The makings of
• Method in the madness
• Neither rhyme nor reason
• One fell swoop
• Seen better days
• It smells to heaven
• A sorry sight
• A spotless reputation
• Strange bedfellows
• The world's (my) oyster
VOCABULARY WORDS:
THE TAMING OF THE SHREW
Adverbs:
importantly
instinctively
threateningly
tightly
trippingly
unaware
Nouns:
accused
addiction
alligator
amazement
anchovies
assassination
backing
bandit
bedroom
courtship
critic
dawn
design
discontent
eyeball
fixture
glow
gust
hint
investments
leapfrog
luggage
manager
mimic
ode
outbreak
pageantry
questioning
reinforcement
retirement
savagery
tardiness
urging
watchdog
wormhole
zany  
Verbs:
besmirch
bet
blanket
cake
cater
champion
compromise
denote
dialogue
dislocate
divest
drug
dwindle
elbow
enmesh
gossip
grovel
hobnob
humour
hurry
impedes
jet
jig
label
lapse
lower
misquote
negotiate
numb
pander
partner
petition
puke
rant
reword
secure
submerge
swagger
torture
unclog
WORDS WORDS WORDS
Some people say they don't understand
Shakespeare's Words!   

Go on line to www.dictionary.com and try to figure
out the best definition of the following words in
The Taming of the Shrew.  

abjure
accouterments
askance
argosy
bandy
banns
bauble
brazen
carouse
cavil
chafe
chattels
conserves
coxcomb
dainty
denier
dotard
drudge
ducat
encounter
enthrall
fain
fray
gamut
haggard
homage
hose
ingenious
kindred
lusty
ordinance
pantaloon
pate
prodigy
quaff
reverence
savor
trencher
usurp
vantage  





A mock up of the initial stage design is to the right.

Using the theme of water, the stage's original design
featured a 20'  infinity waterfall.  The simple design had
red fabric columns topped by propane torches.  A center
platform slides over the 'river' to be used as a bed, a
banquet table and a platform for the throne.  

The river to be used by the Witches as their cauldron, for
battle scene drownings and of course, for Lady M's
famous hand-washing scene.

The main stage is bare, permitting free movement of the
actors and plenty of room to swing those broadswords.  
Our stage is low to the ground to accommodate audience
members at ground level.

The Intermediate Design is at the top of this page
on the right.
Now look at the interim model made by architecture
student, Demetrius Carter.   What elements have
changed?   Why do you think the director changed the
designs?  

Final Design
Below is the final version of the stage.  The one that was
used in performance.  What are the differences in the
concept, model and final version?  Which do you prefer?  
Which do you think is easier for the actors to perform on?
Set Design
The Director and Designer Make Choices
MODEL FOR THE STAGE OF MACBETH  
Words Coined by William
Shakespeare
Lesson Plans